Author Topic: Twin cam engine case question  (Read 1343 times)

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Offline hotbagger1

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Twin cam engine case question
« on: February 05, 2018, 12:23:39 PM »
I have a 2000 Electra Glide. I want to build a 110 cubic inch motor for it. My question is should I bore the stock cases or should I buy a new set of cases? I will be saving myself a ton of money by not spending money on new cases but are the stock cases from 2000 strong enough to handle the power of a 110 cubic inch motor?

Offline Ohio HD

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2018, 01:05:47 PM »
You can certainly bore the cases. You might even consider going 117" while your there. The only real difference is the 117" will use base gaskets, and your 110" using OEM cylinders would use the o-rings. You can also go to 113" if you chose to bore the 110" cylinders larger, to 4.062", they would still of course use the o-ring at the base.

I assume you know you need a 4-3/8" crank?



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Offline 1FSTRK

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2018, 01:27:43 PM »
I have a 2000 Electra Glide. I want to build a 110 cubic inch motor for it. My question is should I bore the stock cases or should I buy a new set of cases? I will be saving myself a ton of money by not spending money on new cases but are the stock cases from 2000 strong enough to handle the power of a 110 cubic inch motor?

I would/will use the stock cases.
You need to bore cases, buy a crank and cylinder/piston kit so why build a 110?
I am looking at the same deal with my 05 but I have ruled the 110" out if I am going to all the trouble.
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Offline Prostock

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2018, 02:22:29 PM »
Your current cases have the timken bearing which is a plus.  New SE cases do not.

Offline Scott P

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2018, 05:56:34 AM »
I have a 2000 Electra Glide. I want to build a 110 cubic inch motor for it. My question is should I bore the stock cases or should I buy a new set of cases? I will be saving myself a ton of money by not spending money on new cases but are the stock cases from 2000 strong enough to handle the power of a 110 cubic inch motor?

Unlike certain year Evo cases and Shovels, OEM Twin Cam cases have no history whatsoever of becoming unglued, due to correctly boring to accept larger cylinder spigot diameters.
Those OEM cases will handle the power of a 124", that makes BIG steam.
No worries.
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Offline koko3052

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2018, 06:32:09 AM »
hotbagger1... I'm doing just what you are doing right now after collecting the pieces over the last few years & would suggest that you use Axtell cylinders. Thicker & 5/8" longer spigot will give you a much longer lasting engine. I'm too far gone to change mine so will run it with HD cyls. I would strongly suggest that you get the spigot holes bored by a good machinest as I have read HDs procedure thru & thru & their "sloppy fit" in the cases makes no sense. When you do all this I would suggest boring the inner cam bearing journals for the B168 bearings just to have a better selection of cams & upgrade to hydraulic tensioners as many good "take outs" are available at decent prices.

Offline hotbagger1

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2018, 11:49:42 AM »
I have a 2000 Electra Glide. I want to build a 110 cubic inch motor for it. My question is should I bore the stock cases or should I buy a new set of cases? I will be saving myself a ton of money by not spending money on new cases but are the stock cases from 2000 strong enough to handle the power of a 110 cubic inch motor?

Unlike certain year Evo cases and Shovels, OEM Twin Cam cases have no history whatsoever of becoming unglued, due to correctly boring to accept larger cylinder spigot diameters.
Those OEM cases will handle the power of a 124", that makes BIG steam.
No worries.
Right now I have the Gear Drive cams in my reason for asking the question was I wasn't sure if boring the stock cases would make them weaker. And I was going back and forth between Axtell cylinders or revolution performance cylinders I haven't made up my mind yet.

Offline Scott P

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2018, 12:42:18 PM »
No worries.
Many shops that are so equipped, bore cases constantly.

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Offline tmwmoose

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2018, 01:08:33 PM »
Hotbagger1 your inbox is full

Offline rigidthumper

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2018, 01:32:28 PM »
Right now I have the Gear Drive cams in my reason for asking the question was I wasn't sure if boring the stock cases would make them weaker. And I was going back and forth between Axtell cylinders or revolution performance cylinders I haven't made up my mind yet.
The cases you have are good as any to come from the MOCO. I have used both Axtell, and RP. Would use Axtell again, or S&S, but not RP.
Given the expense of new flywheels/pistons/cylinders, I'd also recommend 124", because the difference in expense is small compared to the difference in performance.

Offline 1FSTRK

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2018, 01:39:31 PM »
Right now I have the Gear Drive cams in my reason for asking the question was I wasn't sure if boring the stock cases would make them weaker. And I was going back and forth between Axtell cylinders or revolution performance cylinders I haven't made up my mind yet.

The cases you have are good as any to come from the MOCO. I have used both Axtell, and RP. Would use Axtell again, or S&S, but not RP.
Given the expense of new flywheels/pistons/cylinders, I'd also recommend 124", because the difference in expense is small compared to the difference in performance.


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Offline prodrag1320

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2018, 04:21:01 PM »
your cases are fine to bore

Offline K4FXD

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2018, 08:58:21 PM »
Just to be different, I'd keep the 4 inch stroke and go all bore 110.

Should make plenty of reliable no pms power.
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Offline 1FSTRK

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #13 on: February 08, 2018, 04:30:12 AM »
Just to be different, I'd keep the 4 inch stroke and go all bore 110.

Should make plenty of reliable no pms power.

Who makes 4.185 cylinders and pistons?
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Offline TorQuePimp

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #14 on: February 08, 2018, 04:55:27 AM »
4.35+4.10 sleeve

Bored to 4.185

Makes a 120" with a 4 3/8 stroke

Offline hotbagger1

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #15 on: February 08, 2018, 05:10:19 AM »
I know the factory cases can handle it and I know plenty of shops out there are capable of boring the cases, but i figured buying cases already bored from the manufacturer would be a lot more precise than having a machine shop bore my factory cases.

Offline 1FSTRK

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #16 on: February 08, 2018, 05:11:57 AM »
I know the factory cases can handle it and I know plenty of shops out there are capable of boring the cases, but i figured buying cases already bored from the manufacturer would be a lot more precise than having a machine shop bore my factory cases.

I will be the first to disagree with that statement. I would think just the opposite.
Mass produced VS the craftsman that I know and trust.
 
Added
Nothing wrong with new cases, just don't see them being more precise.
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Offline BVHOG

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #17 on: February 08, 2018, 05:49:09 AM »
Boring the cases is no big deal, with the jims jig or a mill. Keep in mind you are only clearancing the case for the spigot and potentially the piston skirt should it drop below the cylinders you use. No need for support as it may cause a problem where there is none to begin with.
 As for the cylinders we have all seen the Axtel problems in the past. The revperf nicasil would be at the bottom of my list. Even if there is no problem with the ring seal etc I still don't feel they have the stability in a big bore that a cast lined cylinder has.  The S&S cylinders are proven, priced right and readily available.  Zero worry with your cases, like always use new studs and should you go the stroker route that be sure to use piston jets that are designed for the extra stroke.
Also don't discount the use of the Harley bigger bore cylinders and a 113 motor. Still one of my favorite street engines and the cylinders are very reliable and priced right.
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Offline Eglider05

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #18 on: February 08, 2018, 11:34:15 AM »
The revperf nicasil would be at the bottom of my list.

Due to past experiences they wouldn't even be on my list.

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Offline FSG

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #19 on: February 09, 2018, 12:05:27 AM »
I know the factory cases can handle it and I know plenty of shops out there are capable of boring the cases, but i figured buying cases already bored from the manufacturer would be a lot more precise than having a machine shop bore my factory cases.

I'd be having a machine shop, perhaps one of our fine vendors bore your 2000 cases, while they were at it I'd have them go right over the cases, even bore out the cam bearings to take the larger B168s. 

Offline Deye76

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2018, 04:53:02 AM »
"Also don't discount the use of the Harley bigger bore cylinders and a 113 motor. Still one of my favorite street engines and the cylinders are very reliable and priced right."

 :up: I ran them hard for 10+ years. Stock cases too.
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Offline itsafatboy

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #21 on: February 18, 2018, 06:06:05 PM »
i would bore to handle the 4 1/8 piston then you can stroke to what you want i would do the 4 5/8 get he 124 , get it done the first time because you will wish you did , 4 1/8 is fine i had one that went to a 4.250 and thats where you run into the base gasket issue and it will leak, so i would do the 124 since your in there any way no reason not to,     

Offline harley_cruiser

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #22 on: February 18, 2018, 06:50:49 PM »
I know the factory cases can handle it and I know plenty of shops out there are capable of boring the cases, but i figured buying cases already bored from the manufacturer would be a lot more precise than having a machine shop bore my factory cases.

I'd be having a machine shop, perhaps one of our fine vendors bore your 2000 cases, while they were at it I'd have them go right over the cases, even bore out the cam bearings to take the larger B168s.
Second that, eliminate the conversion cams, will give you more choices.

Online les

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #23 on: February 18, 2018, 09:05:42 PM »
Boring the cases is no big deal, with the jims jig or a mill. Keep in mind you are only clearancing the case for the spigot and potentially the piston skirt should it drop below the cylinders you use. No need for support as it may cause a problem where there is none to begin with.
 As for the cylinders we have all seen the Axtel problems in the past. The revperf nicasil would be at the bottom of my list. Even if there is no problem with the ring seal etc I still don't feel they have the stability in a big bore that a cast lined cylinder has.  The S&S cylinders are proven, priced right and readily available.  Zero worry with your cases, like always use new studs and should you go the stroker route that be sure to use piston jets that are designed for the extra stroke.
Also don't discount the use of the Harley bigger bore cylinders and a 113 motor. Still one of my favorite street engines and the cylinders are very reliable and priced right.

If you need to bore down to 2.250" to clear for pistons, the JIMS tool will only go down to about 1.7" - 1.8".  So, it could be a big deal boring the cases if you're depending on the JIMS tool.  The tool will bore for the spigot no problem, but in some cases that means nothing if you can't bore for the piston clearance too.

Offline BVHOG

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Re: Twin cam engine case question
« Reply #24 on: February 19, 2018, 05:49:59 AM »
Boring the cases is no big deal, with the jims jig or a mill. Keep in mind you are only clearancing the case for the spigot and potentially the piston skirt should it drop below the cylinders you use. No need for support as it may cause a problem where there is none to begin with.
 As for the cylinders we have all seen the Axtel problems in the past. The revperf nicasil would be at the bottom of my list. Even if there is no problem with the ring seal etc I still don't feel they have the stability in a big bore that a cast lined cylinder has.  The S&S cylinders are proven, priced right and readily available.  Zero worry with your cases, like always use new studs and should you go the stroker route that be sure to use piston jets that are designed for the extra stroke.
Also don't discount the use of the Harley bigger bore cylinders and a 113 motor. Still one of my favorite street engines and the cylinders are very reliable and priced right.



If you need to bore down to 2.250" to clear for pistons, the JIMS tool will only go down to about 1.7" - 1.8".  So, it could be a big deal boring the cases if you're depending on the JIMS tool.  The tool will bore for the spigot no problem, but in some cases that means nothing if you can't bore for the piston clearance too.


Not an issue, it simply leaves a very small ridge that i remove with a burr and then smooth out all sharp edges with a sanding roll. 5 minute job. I've done at least a dozen this way.
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